The Art of Sports Photography at The Olympic Museum

This summer The Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland, will be featuring exhibitions and programs celebrating The Art of Sports Photography.  I have the honor of being a part of two of the exhibits: Rio 2016 Seen Through the Lenses of Four Photographers, which features my work from The Olympic Games in Rio last summer and Who Shot Spots: A Photographic History, 1845 to Present, a traveling  exhibit curated by my friend, the indomitable Gail Buckland, which I am very proud to be a part of.

If you can’t make it to Switzerland to explore The Art of Sports Photography, follow me on Instagram @johnhuet where I’ll be posting a new sports photo every day for the rest of the summer in honor of this amazing program. And for an in-depth look at the Who Shot Sports exhibit, you might be interested in picking up the accompanying book by the same name.

If you’d like to join me in celebrating The Art of Sports Photography, hashtag your images with #theartofsportsphotography, and let’s keep this rolling.  I look forward to seeing you out there.




I was recently interviewed by Heidi Volpe for Rob Haggart’s photography blog, A Photo Editor. We talked about the technique involved in shooting synchronized swimmer Bill May for the ESPN feature, and she even spoke to Bill May himself. Below is my introduction from the piece. Click the preview to read the rest of the interview on Haggart’s blog, or head over to my website to see the entire collection of Bill May photos. 

“I don’t really adjust my style for different projects, nor can I really define my own style.

This simple story sum things up nicely – Alfred Eisenstaedt was hired to shoot our college portraits. He came into my class of 20 kids, and he asked everyone, “What kind of photographer do you want to be?” I was one of the last kids to be asked, when it was my turn, I replied, “fashion photographer.” He asked why. He’d not asked any of the other kids this follow up question. I panicked and blurted out, “Because I like girls!” Everyone in class had a good laugh, and then Alfred later explained that being a fashion photographer is no different than being any other type of photographer. You have a subject in front of you, treat that subject in front of you the same as you would a gown on a hanger.  It becomes a portrait of a gown, just as if a person was standing there.

So, I don’t look at myself or categorize myself as a sports photographer, I see myself as a photographer, and I see the subject in front of me as a subject. At the end of day, all photographs are solved with the same notes, regardless of the subject matter.”



When asked about my strategy while shooting an enormous event like the Olympics, I said,”In competitive sports you’re always trying to look for what’s different, what hasn’t been done – there are so many photographs of the same person crossing the finish line – how do you find that iconic shot? You have no idea when it’s going to happen. My strategy is to figure out what’s going to make someone feel like they were actually at the event.”

AtEdge, a marketing program that connects art buyers and photo producers with creative professionals, recently featured me on their blog. Click the link to read the rest of the article “JOHN HUET: CAPTURING THE POWER AND VULNERABILITY OF THE COMPETITIVE ATHLETE” on their site!